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FAQs


Q. Can I use a family member or friend’s old hearing aid?
Q. If I decide I don’t like the hearing aid can I return it for a refund?
Q. Does my new hearing aid come with a warranty?
Q. What do I do if I have lost or damaged my hearing aid?
Q. Does Medicare or my private health insurance cover the cost of hearing aids?
Q. Does my health insurance cover the cost of a swim plug, even if my physician recommends it?
Q. May I donate my old hearing aid(s)?
Q. How often do I need to replace my hearing aids?
Q. Do I need to return to have my hearing aids serviced on a regular basis?
Q. How many visits are required when purchasing a new hearing aid?
Q. Where do I buy hearing aid batteries?
Q. Do I sleep with my hearing aids in?
Q. What if I get my hearing aid wet?
Q. Do I need to take my hearing aid out when going through airport security?
Q. What are the most common reasons hearing aids fail to function?
Q. How frequently do I need to have my hearing tested?
Q. How do I reactivate my dry-aid kit?
Q. My hearing aid won’t work. What should I try first?
Q. Do you have a payment program for the purchase of hearing aids?
Q. What exactly is a hearing aid evaluation?

Q. Can I use a family member or friend’s old hearing aid?
A. If the hearing aid is the style that fits behind-the-ear and is appropriate for your type and degree of hearing loss, the answer is yes. We would need to assess your hearing and determine if you can wear the old hearing aid. You would need to buy an earmold and pay a nonrefundable fitting fee, which includes the fitting and three follow up visits. Any hearing aid with instrumentation that fits entirely in the ear is a custom-made piece which cannot be modified to fit another user.


Q. If I decide I don’t like the hearing aid, can I return it for a refund?
A. We offer a 30-day trial period during which time you can return the hearing aid for any reason. If you decide you do not like the hearing instrument(s), all of your money will be refunded, minus the initial deposit.


Q. Does my new hearing aid come with a warranty?
A. All new hearing aids come with at least one year of warranty coverage, which typically includes repairs, loss and damage.


Q. What do I do if I have lost or damaged my hearing aid?
A. You will need to call the office and schedule an appointment for an earmold impression. If the hearing aid is covered under warranty there is a replacement fee as stated on the contract that is due at the time of the earmold impression. Many manufacturers require a notarized statement regarding the hearing aid's loss or damage.  You will need to bring this statement with you to the earmold appointment.


Q. Does Medicare or my private health insurance cover the cost of hearing aids?
A. Medicare does not pay for hearing aids under any circumstances. Some private health insurances cover a portion of the hearing aid cost but it can be difficult to determine exactly how much of the cost that they will cover.


Q. Does my health insurance cover the cost of a swim plug, even if my physician recommends it?

A. Typically not. Only rarely do some health insurances cover swim plugs. It is most likely going to be an out-of-pocket expense, even if your physician recommends it.


Q. May I donate my old hearing aid(s)?
A. Yes. We work with a nonprofit foundation called Project EAR, Inc. Simply bring the hearing aids into one of our offices for donation and Project EAR, Inc. will send you a letter for tax purposes.


Q. How often do I need to replace my hearing aids?

A. Approximately every five years.  Hearing aid technology rolls over about every five years. Replacing your hearing aids after five years would afford you the opportunity to take advantage of the most sophisticated technology.


Q. Do I need to return to have my hearing aids serviced on a regular basis?

A. Our audiologists recommend you return to our office for visits every six months to have your hearing aids thoroughly cleaned and checked.


Q. How many visits are required when purchasing a new hearing aid?
A. On average there are four to five visits associated with the initial fitting of hearing aids. This includes a hearing evaluation, a hearing aid evaluation, fitting and instruction of the instruments, a two-week follow-up appointment and a 30-day trial end appointment.


Q. Where do I buy hearing aid batteries?

A. Hearing aid batteries can be purchased at our office by the package or in bulk. In addition, any store that has a pharmaceutical counter typically will sell batteries.


Q. Do I sleep with my hearing aids in?
A. Typically not. Hearing aids are not comfortable to sleep in. If you are concerned that the severity of your hearing loss would prevent you from being alerted to the telephone, door bell or fire alarms, there are a wide variety of assistive devices that you can use at night time while your hearing aids are out.


Q. What if I get my hearing aid wet?
A. Get the hearing aids out of the moisture as quickly as possible. Remove the battery and place them in your dry aid kit (follow the kit instructions). If you do not have a dry aid kit, open the battery compartment and dry the aid with a blow dryer on low heat. Schedule an appointment to have the hearing aid assessed in our office.


Q. Do I need to take my hearing aid out when going through airport security?

A. No


Q. What are the most common reasons hearing aids fail to function?

A. Moisture and ear wax. You can protect your hearing aids from component failure due to moisture by keeping them dry, and not leaving them in the bathroom while bathing.  If you will be perspiring heavily during physical activity, you may choose to leave the hearing aids out. If you have a dry aid kit, place the aids in the kit overnight.
Wax can clog the opening where sound is delivered to the ear, either the earmold or the sound bore of the hearing aid itself. Inspect the hearing aid on a daily basis to be sure the sound bore is open. There are small brushes, loops and thin filament tools that can be used to remove the wax. 


Q. How frequently do I need to have my hearing tested?
A.  Every two years or earlier if you notice a change in your hearing sensitivity.
 

Q. How do I reactivate my dry-aid kit?
A. You may have a metal canister containing the drying crystals, and this system can be placed on a baking sheet in a 350-degree oven for approximately 30 minutes. Once the blue color is restored to the crystals the kit is reactivated.  Make sure it is cooled before placing it back in the plastic container. 

If you are using a dry brick system, then check for a change in color on the brick package. The old brick will need to be discarded and replaced with a new one.  Often these just need to be replaced every several months.

If you have a plastic container of crystals, you can place this in the microwave, SCREEN SIDE UP, for 1 minute on high and allow to cool for 20 minutes before handling.  Beads will turn amber when reactivated. 


Q. My hearing aid won’t work. What should I try first?

A. The first thing to check is the battery. If the battery is good, inspect the sound bore (where the sound exits the shell of an in-the-ear hearing aid or the earmold). With the new slim tubes, remove the slim tube from the hearing aid and run the thin filament cleaning tool through the silastic tubing. If you are unsuccessful, you may contact our office for an appointment or determine if you can drop off the hearing aid to be checked.

Q. Do you have a payment program for the purchase of hearing aids?

A. No. However, we do offer information from CareCredit.  These services can be, but are not limited to, cosmetic procedures, hearing aids and any diagnostic or elective surgery. In order for the services to be covered, the patient must first be approved for the loan to cover the services.


Q. What exactly is a hearing aid evaluation?

A. A hearing aid evaluation is a one-hour appointment scheduled with an audiologist to determine the appropriate style and technology of hearing loss to accommodate your communication needs and lifestyle. Should you decide to go through an evaluation with amplification, the hearing aid can be ordered during this visit and a deposit toward the cost of the hearing aid is collected that day.

 

 

 

 

 

Contact any of our OSU ENT offices to set up an appointment with one of our dedicated staff. Turn to OSU ENT for your ear, nose and throat doctor in and around Columbus, Ohio.